Recent Posts

Thursday, 9 August 2012

Olympic Poster Process

Over the last few weeks I've received some really lovely emails expressing how much people have enjoyed the GetAheadoftheGames transport posters for the Olympic Games (Go team GB!). I've had conversations about specific characters, peoples favourite poster, hidden meanings, and even the Illuminati, but what I've been asked about most is process.

So here goes..

Initially we'd be given a brief description and/or a basic sketch (think stick man) of what was needed for the poster. From there we'd have a limited amount of time to get a first pass or rough sketch drawn up for approval. This was usually done traditionally (with good old fashioned pencil and paper!), however for whatever reason this one ended up being sketched digitally.


If everyone is happy, then we'd be asked to do a final drawing and layout the poster ready for painting.


After making any changes (I was asked to change the sign she was holding to a no entry sign on this particular poster) we'd do a flat colour block in for one last approval before the painting begins. (I seem to have misplaced this particular step sorry!)



Then after many hours of painting and some more back and forth, we reach the final painting. At this stage the painting is passed onto M&C Saatchi and final tweaks will be made before it's laid out with everything (type etc.) and sent to print!

Taken from www.getaheadofthegames.com

Aaaaand done! Here's one of the final posters featuring the artwork.


The basic process


There were a dozen artists working on the campaign, with each poster being a collaborative effort. Often with several artists working on the same poster at various stages throughout the process. Each finished poster represents a huge team effort, and I was privileged to part of it.

Click here to download a large selection of the finished printed posters. 

Shout outs to the team!
M&C Saatchi, London, by copywriter Joe Miller, art director Tristan Cornelius and illustrated by twelve designers under the supervision of Sam Lanyon Jones and Andy Cope at Tokyo Plastic, produced by the lovely folks at Picasso Pictures. credits via the inspiration room.


0 comments:

Post a comment